You’re Eating Sandwiches Wrong | Food Network

You’re Eating Sandwiches Wrong | Food Network


DAN PASHMAN: Biting
into a sandwich should be cause for
celebration, but it can also lead to disaster. I’m going to show you how to
build a sandwich the fillings never fall out, using
an old friend of mine I like to call science. [music playing] Joining me now is scientist
and comedian, Tim Lee. Hey, Tim.
– Hey, Dan. Tim, why don’t
ya do me a favor and press down on this sandwich
to simulate bite force. Let’s see what happens. Slippery sandwich fillings. Such an issue. I call this the Sliced
Cucumber Conundrum. [ding] So what can we do to
make our sandwiches better? What you want
is a sandwich that has a lot of resistive
force to that pressure, a lot of friction.
[ding] For a sandwich, what we’re
looking for is ingredients with very high static friction. Are there certain
greens, you think, that would have extra friction? Yeah, there are certainly
greens that have a higher coefficient of friction. Ones that come to mind are
like arugula and frisee. DAN PASHMAN: Why? TIM LEE: Rougher surfaces
tend to have a higher coefficient of friction. And those are just greens
that have rougher surfaces. I’m going to
show you something I’ve come up with that I
think you’re going to like. It’s called the Silver
Lining of Greens. The most slippery of
common sandwich ingredients are cucumber,
tomato, and avocado. First thing I do is mash up the
avocado and use it as a spread, because it’s less
slippery that way. After that, don’t bunch up
all your sandwich greens in one spot in the sandwich. Instead do thin layers
of greens throughout. That creates friction
between each layer. [ding] So Tim, we have the
sandwich that I made using the Silver Lining of Greens. I put it on softer bread,
which requires less bite force. Should we go ahead and, rather
than simulate bite force, give it some real bite force? Oh, yeah. I’ve been waiting for this. All right. [music playing] DAN PASHMAN: Mmm. TIM LEE: That’s good design. You like that? See where it holds
together so nicely? Well, Tim Lee,
thank you very much. And thank you also to friction. DAN PASHMAN: Check
out my podcast. It’s called The Sporkful. Subscribe today.

16 thoughts on “You’re Eating Sandwiches Wrong | Food Network

  1. One strange thing I will do to avocado is add one of those power grains all your healthy friends have like chia or one of the other 30 or so seed or oat things normal people never buy and it adds more friction and generally protein, fiber as well as riboflavinoids they claim to be only in their current fad grain.

  2. I prefer to use two bricks. I find the weight of the easily found household item not only adds terrific colour to what can be considered a bland item but, the overall sandwich density keeps me fuller for longer. #weightloss #beachbody #fullforlonger

  3. You can dice up the tomato (so it doesn't slide out with bite) or crinkle cut the cucumber with a mandolin avocados aren't that slippery when fully ripen.

    Mayo, french mustard and other sauces are also good binders.

    And with sturdier breads like the first one how bout not cutting it all the way just butterfly it like a hot dog bun or wrap it tightly like it was a subway sandwich/burrito

  4. #THEREISNORIGHTORWRONGWAYTOEATFOOD THIS WEB SERIES IS A HUGE LIE AND VERY CONTROLING THIS SERIES NEEDS TO BE BANNED OR CANCELED WHICH EVER COMES FIRST THIS SERIES PISSES ME OFF ITS FOOD YOU EAT IT THERE IS NO RIGHT WAY OR WRONG WAY TO EAT FOOD THESE PEOPLE ON THIS SHOW ARE TOATAL MOUSE BRAINS

  5. Don't tell us how to eat. There's no wrong way to eat. You are out of line for telling the public that we are eating wrong. Let us eat the way we want you ignorant bastard!!!!!!!!!!! Quit making a name for yourself. You suck!!!!!!!!

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